R.C. Chapman’s S.O.S. 1:13

“A bundle of myrrh is my well-beloved unto me: He shall lie all night betwixt my breast.” —Song of Solomon 1:13

My Soul! Is the night season wearisome! Art thou like a sick man, full of tossings to and fro, because of sin that dwelleth in thee, and because of longing to behold thy Lord face to face?

Thou art not of the night nor of darkness, but of the children of light and of the day; and made meet to be partaker of their inheritance. Be content awhile, my soul—let thy longing be tempered with patience—remember that wert thou this moment with Jesus thou wouldest still be longing for His glorious appearing and the gathering of the Church, His brethren and thine unto Him! The darkness of guilt would indeed be utterly removed from thee didst thou quit thou house of clay; but the mystery of God would not be finished—thou wouldest still be looking for the manifestation of the sons of God, their appearing with the Lord in glory.

He knoweth the thoughts of His heart towards thee, and means thee nothing but kindness—the kindness of eternal love and wisdom infinite! Trust Him, then—fight the good fight of faith, and count not thy life dear to thee, if only Thou mayest finish thy course with joy—be jealous of thy Lord’s good name—grieve not His Spirit—keep thy heart and conscience clean and pure by the blood of sprinkling, and as thou dost daily listen to the voice of thy beloved Lord, and do His will, He will surely make thy heart glad with His words.

He will abide in thee and cause thee to abide in His love; if He prove thee with manifold temptations for a season, as thou needest, He will cause thee to rejoice and glory in infirmities, that the power of Christ may rest upon thee. Nor shall thy joy be carnal, of thy boasting presumptuous! For thy shout of triumph shall proceed from a humble, contrite spirit, and the steadfastness of faith.  Thou shalt worship within the vail with Jesus, thy Forerunner and Royal High Priest; and, holding the balances of faith, shalt call afflictions light, because thou dost weigh them against things eternal and unseen: so shall thou cheer thy heart and beguile the night watches, thy Lord giving thee songs in the darkness.

And these things thou knowest, not by hearing of the ear alone; thou hast tasted and handled them; but count not thyself to have already attained anything, nor esteem thyself already perfect—it shall be thy wisdom and perfection, if forgetting the things that are behind, thou reach after things before thee, and press toward the mark for the prize; that thou mayest know thy Lord Jesus, whose love passeth knowledge and whose riches are unsearchable.

 

 

 

Life of Faith 8: Sinners Justified

By Richard Sibbes

We live the life of faith in justification.  This is a life of sentence that the soul lives by, peace being spoken unto it by the pardon of sin; for God by his Spirit communicates so much to the soul, giving us assurance that Christ our surety and peace-maker is raised up again.

So Ephesians 2:5 says “Even when we were dead in sins, he has given us life together with Christ, and raised us together, and made us sit in heavenly places with him.”  And why?  Because our Surety has paid our debt.  We say of a man condemned, he is a dead man until he have a pardon, which he has obtained, we turn our speech, and say, he lives.  So in justification: being united to Christ, and believing our pardon, we are said to live.  Our sins lie on him as our surety; for then, as our husband in charge, he pays all our debts.

Thus by virtue of our marriage to Christ, he discharges all our debts, and goes away with them; even as the scapegoat in the wilderness went quite away will all the sins and iniquities of the people, never to return again.  Look to our sins, the curse and wrath due them, and all is laid on him.  Look at all the good in him, that is for us; all the evil in us, look also to him for it, to have it taken away, pardoned, and not imputed.


This common domain work modernized in few places.

Christian Love 16: Love Never Fails

By Hugh Binning

“Love never fails.”  This is the last note of commendation.  Things have their excellency from their use and from their continuance; both are here.  Nothing so useful, no such friend of human or Christian society as love, the benefits of it reaches all things.  And then, it is most permanent and durable.  When all will go, it will remain.  When ordinances, and knowledge attained by means of ordinances, vanish, love will abide, and then receive its completion.  Faith of things not evident and obscure will be drowned in the vision of seeing God’s face clearly.  Hope of things to come will be exhausted in the possession and fruition of them.  But love only remains in its own nature and notion, only it is perfected by the addition of so many degrees as may suit that blessed state.

Therefore I think it should be the study of all saints who believe immortality, and hope for eternal life, to put on that garment of charity, which is the clothing of all the inhabitants above.  We might have heaven on earth as far as it is possible if we dwelt in love, and love dwelt in and possessed our hearts.  What an unsuitable thing might a believer think it, to hate him in this world whom he must love eternally, and to contend and strive with these, even over small matters, with bitterness and rigidity, with whom he shall have an eternal, uninterrupted unity and fellowship?  Should we not be testing here how that glorious garment suits us?  And truly there is nothing that makes a man so heaven-like or God like as this, much love and charity.

Now there is one consideration that might persuade us more to it, that here we know but darkly in part, and therefore our knowledge, at best, is but obscure and not evident, often subject to many mistake and misunderstandings of truth, according as means of communication present them.  And therefore there must be some latitude of love allowed one to another in this state of imperfection, else it is impossible to keep unity, and we must conflict often with our own shadows, and bite and devour one another for some deceiving appearances.

The imperfection and obscurity of knowledge should make all men suspicious of themselves, especially in matters of a doubtful nature, and not so clearly determined by scripture.  Because our knowledge is weak, shall our love be so?  No, rather let charity grow stronger, and aspire to perfection, because knowledge is imperfect.  What is wanting in knowledge let us make up in affection, and let the gap of difference in judgment be swallowed up with the bowels of mercies and love, and humbleness of mind.  And then we shall have hid our weakness of understanding as much as may be.  Thus we may go hand in hand together to our Father’s house, where, at length, we must be together.

 


This common domain work has been modernized in few places.

 

This is the End of Christian Love, chapter 2.